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Palimpsest
Palimpsest
6.1
Palimpsest
6.1

Marek, the main character of "Palimpsest," is a police inspector, a man on the verge of psychological disintegration trying to solve an intricate case. The story is told on two planes. The first one is a crime story, which constitutes the framework of the film. In the course of events, another theme appears - psychological experiences of the main character. Vivid blend of picture with sound and music will draw the audience into the deepest recesses of Marek's mind, making the viewers face questions: What is reality and what is only an illusion? Where is the borderline between the real world and our perception of it? What makes suffering meaningful and what is really important in one's life"?

Palimpsest
Palimpsest
0.0
Palimpsest
0.0

Palimpsest charts the changing lives of the interior of one house over a period of three centuries, a time-frame compressed into ten minutes - portrayed through a combination of time -lapse, real-time, and stop-frame photography. The camera is fixed as the 'space' inside the frame itself transforms, destructs and evolves over the years: historical eras are evoked through references to 17th, 18th and 19th century painting and early 20th century cinema and the human presence in the house is signalled through scenes of everyday labor and domestic duty.

Palimpsest
Palimpsest
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Palimpsest
0.0

A successful house tuner provides clients with a unique form of therapy that examines subtle details in their living spaces.

Palimpsest Palindrome
Palimpsest Palindrome
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Palimpsest Palindrome
0.0

Mirrored from left to right and front to back, this multilayered black and white symmetrical abstract horror film has apocalypse written all over it. It is still a lot of fun to see and is not without its humor.

Palimpsests
Palimpsests
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Palimpsests
0.0

This film is from the project Unconformities, comprised of artworks made up from the material of surveyed land, extracted from coring construction sites in Paris, Athens and Beirut. These cores bare their "unconformities"—temporal ruptures, natural disasters, geological movements—in full view, revealing a constant cycle of construction and deconstruction that is the defining feature of civilisations past and present, with each using the stones of the last. History appears not as layers but as actions, a kind of palimpsest mixing epochs and civilizations. These poetic recompositions question the dominant forms of narrating and representing history, but also address debates around the Anthropocene.